The other day…

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewyorker%2Fvideos%2F10154991782723869%2F&show_text=0&width=560 …what do you do when a student thinks something is funny when it clearly is not? Not only is it not funny, but racist, threatening, and aggressive? …when a student holds a misconception so deep, so off, that you know it came from someone’s comment/belief, growing unchecked? …when a student believes you have no idea what drives them, what motivates them because they are dangerously un-self-aware that nothing an outside influence could say mends that trauma? Do personal stories help? Not without context. Someone watching this, without context or background knowledge, and lack of maturity, might walk away thinking…

Saving Summer: Real world problems.

We need some new statues. pic.twitter.com/t5a7nK8jeT — Hank Green 🐢 (@hankgreen) August 13, 2017 //platform.twitter.com/widgets.js My response: What do I post today? Do I show an image of Heather Heyer, the young woman who was murdered on Saturday, August 12 in Charlottesville? Do I talk about the boy-man, who allegedly ran her down in the crowd of counter-protesters? Or the initial interview with his mother who had no idea what happened, or who he was? I look at others media posts: simply trying to live their happy lives, going through transitions and life moments without any of static and noise…

Elements of Structure Series: Part 11: Tough questions: students and humor

This video is PG-13. And no, the number doesn’t work. A student shared this with me a few weeks ago. To spark a conversation, I thought it would be interesting to see what other students thought about it, too. Students also watched this one, too. No commentary from me, just questions. As this writing, they’ve only seen it once in the context of notes, but haven’t had a chance to do a QFT or discussion about it. But — I have my own questions. A lot of them. Would I have shared this with students who were predominately white? Or would…

Strength to fall, strength to fail, and courage to rise

I am not a Tarot card reader, though I’ve always appreciated the art, both the visual art and the reading art of it. The reading of people is an art form I lack, woefully. Sometimes human behavior mystifies me, and I fill in my lack of knowledge with pure lizard brain responses. Or maybe it is that I read people all too well, but haven’t developed the kind, soft tools to maneuver or add nuance to these interactions, especially when they go south. Unfortunately for my personal and professional relationships, this doesn’t always take the form of gentle, self-reflective musing,…

Sticks, stones, and comment feeds

This blog acts as a digital sketchbook, a virtual cocktail napkin, as a means of my sorting of thoughts. I am truly interested in what you think, too, so please comment. The question is: do we label ourselves and others too much? I know a single mother whose son just graduated high school. Our sons went to School of Rock together, and she took some great photographs during my son’s time there. These young people are amazing musicians. She has survived cancer, is stunningly beautiful, smart, edgy, and talented. She has pink hair. She has perfect skin. She thinks for herself….