Dogmatix.

For the past two years, I’ve shared Julian Treasure’s two powerful TED Talks about listening and speaking.  I wish my PLC would watch them together and come to some understanding of how we can communicate to our full potential and then was reminded there is no magic wand or quick fix. And, we’re not broken either, just new and working out our particular personalities. But I can have my students watch them, gleaning the best advice he offers. All my students shared in an interest survey they would like quiet when reading or writing — heavy cognitive demands. And yet, those who…

Metacognition Monday

In the 8 Days a Week post, I touched on some of the alliterative devices used to help frame a week. Frameworks help me focus: inviting students into my brain requires some house rules, ya know. During my cohort’s masters program, our primary mentor and educational goddess, Dr. Schulhauser, introduced us to this word, ‘metacognition.’ She eased us into with masterful prestidigitation, a pedagogical slight of hand, we didn’t even realize we were deeply engaged in a lesson until she showed us what lay behind the curtain: we were thinking about our thinking. But like all masters, understanding metacognition is deceptively…

Land of the Lost: Allusions, Annotating, and Anagnorisis

  Metacognition is the mind-map that is the survival tool in reading comprehension: it is that ‘thinking about thinking,’ the big picture, and knowing where you’re going, and, perhaps more importantly, when you’re lost: Anagnorisis is the moment in the story where the character, usually the protagonist, says, “Uh-oh.” According to Merriam-Webster, it is: Main Entry: an·ag·no·ri·sis Pronunciation: ˌa-ˌnag-ˈnȯr-ə-səs Function: noun Inflected Form(s): plural an·ag·no·ri·ses –ˌsēz Etymology: Greek anagnōrisis, from anagnōrizein to recognize, from ana- + gnōrizein to make known; akin to Greek gnōrimos well-known, gignōskein to come to know — more at know Date: circa 1800 : the point…