Versus.

George Couros has me thinking (again): “What is the difference between school and learning?” His article, One Question We Should Always Ask… made me think deeply about how the relationship between the classroom teacher, the students, and technology. The battle between getting a student’s attention when all they want to do is gaze at the Mirror of Erised of their smartphone is no joke. Compare two schools’ data; one with 1:1 technology and one without: The reading and math scores are both well below 50%. There is a lot wrong with the SBA test–more wrong than is right when it comes…

This old dog.

Much ado is being made about age these days. Maybe it’s my own resentment of being a digital pioneer, and constantly being reminded I’m in charge of training children for jobs that don’t exist yet (for Pete’s sake, it’s not like I’m asking them to be farriers or corset-stay carvers!) At the NCCE, included in one lecture’s description was “NOT YOUR PARENTS’ TEXTBOOK!” which, yes, using the “o” word — offended me a tad. And not only am I playing a shoddy offense but defense as well. In this political climate my sons’ generation is constantly maligned: labeled entitled, privileged,…

Between a rock and a hard place: decisions, decisions…

mrs-love_help-me-obi_2Well, my wonderful MC students, we’re at a juncture, and as your fearless leader, even I am scratching my head, wondering where to go next. Do we take a left, struggle with Charybdis the whirlpool, or venture past Scylla, knowing a few of our crewmen are bound to be chomped up? Well, how many times have you heard it’s about choices? You’re given a set of options, and you determine the best course of action. As my students know, we are very fortunate to have technology at our disposal – to use to enhance your learning, and my teaching. I thoroughly enjoy using technology…

Why Do We Learn (Anything)?

Happy President’s Day, George. Abe. And the Rest. You Helped Grow a Strong Tree. The other day a student asked why we were bothering with learning about ancient world history/civilizations, mythology, etc. His father (a German citizen) thought learning about American History would be a much more worthwhile use of time. The student wanted to know when during his time in public education would he be learning about American History? (When, indeed? The answer is every day you’ve been in public school, but maybe not as intentional as it should be?) Wow. Where to begin? First, there is a logistical…