Series: White People Homework: Let’s talk (15)

Thank you to Larry Ferlazzo

Series: White People Homework: (11)

What I tried to say in this post, But Justin Schleider (@SchleiderJustin) said it so much better: I am specifically talking to White people because we are the ones who created the problem and we are the ones who need to work towards rectifying what we have done. Plus I can only speak to the groups I am a part of and understand. https://slowchatpe.com/2020/06/09/and-we-still-need-you/ Still, others may be young and just entered the field of education. You have been raised in a White bubble (like myself) and through the purposeful guidance of our communities and family, you have not fully…

Media Festival: Story Unit

Cueva de Las Manos This is a exploration of early human connections and storytelling. Signing, Singing, Speaking: How Language Evolved Music and the Neanderthal’s Communication The Discovery of Fire: Two Million Years of Campfire Stories How Conversations Around Campfire Might Have Shaped Human Cognition And Culture Campfire Tales Serve as Human Social Media Campfire Stories May Have Lead to Early Societal Learning When Fire Met Food, The Brains of Early Humans Grew Bigger What kinds of stories… In 12,000 Year Old Grave, A Shaman Shares Her Tomb with Animal Totems Origin Myths: Definition and Examples Myths and Legends Origin Myths…

Out of context: Language barriers.

Has anyone ever called you “thick” before? Well, according to more updated slang, it doesn’t mean stupid or dumb. We (teachers) know there is power in words and word choices. What I think we forget sometimes (and perhaps I am just speaking for myself) is that we adults lose the magic pixie dust power of invented language. Adolescents will always create new uses of words to suit their own time and needs. They have their own codes.  By the time we grown-ups start to use the word in our everyday vernacular,  that word or phrase has disappeared in a puff of smoke. It’s…

Books You Should Read:

Excerpt: Chapter 20: Dying Languages Speaking, writing, and signing are the three ways in which a language lives and breathes. They are the three mediums through which a language is passed on from one generation to the next. If a language is a healthy language, this is happening all the time. Parents pass their language on to their children, who pass it on to their children … and the language lives on. Languages like English, Spanish, and Chinese are healthy languages. They exist in spoken, written, and signed forms, and they’re used by hundreds of millions of people all over…

You don't say?

From The Writer’s Almanac, April 14, 2010: But then two brothers from Springfield, Massachusetts, stepped in: Charles and George Merriam. They bought the rights to the dictionary and the unsold copies, sold it at a low price, and changed the company to “Merriam-Webster” because Webster had such name recognition. They printed the first Merriam-Webster dictionary on September 24, 1847, for a cost of six dollars. But nothing deterred Webster, and he spent almost 30 years on his project. It took three years for the dictionary to be set into type, and finally, on this day in 1828, it was published….