Series: White People Homework (20) Who?

I read a Tweet yesterday about “canceling Lincoln.” No one is ‘canceling Lincoln.’ But I am asking teachers to do a much better job and overhaul the curriculum and framing of the Civil War. Here are some links from the school year 2018-2019 (8th grade Humanities) and Zinn Education Resources: https://blog0rama.com/2019/05/11/backyard-civil-war/ https://blog0rama.com/2019/05/12/backyard-civil-war-text-pairing/ https://blog0rama.com/2019/05/29/backyard-civil-war-cinematic-blues/ https://www.zinnedproject.org/if-we-knew-our-history/rethinkin-lincoln-on-the-150th-birthday-of-the-emancipation-proclamation/ Cornell Notes: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1WT26UEwg_DImYk69wP_EPNq_n7dy7WDR/view?usp=sharing Teachers: I used this document as a shared reading piece. The students came to their own conclusions: no, Lincoln did not free the slaves. This thread by Jared Yates Sexton is also a good place to start with thinking about Lincoln’s role and…

Backyard Civil War

In 2015, one of the best years of my teaching career, I taught 7th-grade Humanities in a tech academy setting. Part of the joy was the freedom to create curriculum. (Once in a while there is someone who thinks a teacher-created curriculum is a threat to western civilization, but those voices usually belong to those who don’t understand agency, autonomy, and professionalism.) Sitting down with a partner, myself, or a PLC we strive for engagement, purpose, and relevancy. The rigor is embedded in the engagement, and engagement doesn’t always look like what is on the evaluation check-boxes. Teacher-created curriculum is…

Series: Elements of Structure Part 5: Radio and Podcasts

I need to interrupt this regularly scheduled blog post to talk about something…odd. Call it a coincidence, call it fate, call it noticing patterns and ‘close reading’ of the minutiae of my life. Two days ago I chose to catch up on some podcasts, and Stuff You Missed in History Class came on featuring a teacher named Jerry Hancock. His expertise is the history of Sears in American culture, economics, etc. And while that was fascinating, what struck me was his introduction about his teaching life. He clearly says because his school is doing academically well “they” leave him alone,…