Mighty Myth Month: Polly put the kettle on.

Hestia is the Greek goddess of hearth and home. While Hera (Roman counterpart, Juno) rules over marriage, childbirth, and family life, Hestia is the happy house-frau, ruling over domestication and household harmony. She never orders take-out or pizza. Though she has some big-time suitors, she doesn’t marry. She rules over the daily bread, the cooking, and keeping “the home fires buring.” HESTIA was the virgin goddess of the hearth (both private and municipal) and the home. As the goddess of the family hearth she also presided over the cooking of bread and the preparation of the family meal. Hestia was also…

Mighty Myth Month: No bull?

For as long as mankind has been trying to distance himself from his natural, woolly, and animalistic nature, he has also been trying to let it out of its cage from time to time. Off leash. Out of the pen. There are many mythological creatures that are half human, half something animal, vegetable, or mineral, but perhaps none so archetypal as the minotaur: a man’s body with the head of a bull, this is the ultimate macho figure. Bulls represent raw, brute strength. Cows are the docile, grass-chewing milk givers. Bulls are the bad boys, and women love bad boys. I can…

Mighty Myth Month: Psyche.

The name “Psyche” means “Soul” and her union with Eros (aka Cupid) tells the story of how Love and Soul came to be together. By the way, this story is Roman, not Greek, but it works just as well with the Greek, so that is how I shall tell it. This myth had an enormous impact on fairy tales for the next couple of thousand years. Long, long ago a king had three daughters. Psyche, who was the youngest of the three daughters, was so incredibly beautiful that people in her village and outlying areas STOPPED praying to Aphrodite, taking…

Mighty Myth Month: Instructions.

 Look for the video on our Moodle Pages. Instructions By Neil Gaiman Touch the wooden gate in the wall you never saw before. Say “please” before you open the latch, go through, walk down the path. A red metal imp hangs from the green-painted front door, as a knocker, do not touch it; it will bite your fingers. Walk through the house. Take nothing. Eat nothing. However, if any creature tells you that it hungers, feed it. If it tells you that it is dirty, clean it. If it cries to you that it hurts, if you can, ease its…

Mighty Myth Month: Blub. Blub. Blub.

Oh, to be able to swim underwater without any apparatus or device for breathing, to swim and play in the warm waters, fast as a dolphin, and half as smart. Mermaids live deep in our imaginations, perhaps from our aquatic beginnings. We don’t want to be fish, we just want to live like one. Have you spotted the trend in myths, legends, and folklore? Something or someone is given an ability to do what a “normal” human cannot. Create fire. Fly. Change. Breathe under water. We don’t like our limitations; but we don’t just sit back and take it. We…

Mighty Myth Month: Sacred places.

Where do you go when you want sanctuary? What surrounds you? What do you see? How do you block out the world? What do you smell? How slowly does your heart beat? Can you sense that you are better? All cultures have their sacred meeting places: temples, synagogues, churches, and mosques, of every faith, of every civilization, and lasting over time. But what of our modern sacred places, our places of santuary, where we can go and just be? Or, those places where we routinely gather with like-minded souls with the same singular purpose? C onsider this the next time…

Mighty Myth Month: Eeek! A spider!

Here’s looking at you, Anansi! Anansi, you old trickster! From the West African area, the Ashanti tribe originated the tales of the most famous spider-god of all, Anansi. Similar to the Coyote in Native American/Central American tales, Anansi is a trickster, a clever fellow who usually gets the best of his foes. (Usually, but not always.) Anansi by Micha F. Lindemans The Ashanti trickster/culture hero, also called ‘the Spider’. He is the intermediary of the sky god Nyame, his father, on whose command Anansi brings rain to quench the forest fires and determines the borders of oceans and rivers during…

Mighty Myth Month: Birds of a feather.

“Humans have always shared the world with animals and, as prehistoric cave paintings attest, animals have always exerted an endless fascination over people’s minds. We have hunted animals, worked with them, and even worshipped them.” —The Illustrated Book of Myths, Tales and Legends of the World retold by Neil Philip. Queztzalcoatl is the Mayan bird/serpent god who started off as “perfect good.” He was so good, in fact, his brother, Tezcatlipoca, was rather put off by his sibling’s insufferable righteousness. Long story short, Queztzalcoatl ends up in the Land of the Dead, and returning to create mankind out of his…