Gamed.

(We shall return to some other posts on writing, writing workshop, etc. soon.) I have a guilty…well, wouldn’t exactly call it ‘pleasure’…past time, hobby, compulsive process addition, and play a Blizzard game called Hearthstone. It’s a card game based on the archetypal characters in World of Warcraft. It is a value-added app, meaning it’s ‘free’ to those who subscribe to WoW, I think. Maybe. Maybe it’s a a free app. Okay, it is. Yeah. And it makes money from micro-transactions of buying card packs, but one can also earn points and trade those points in for cards, disenchant them, and…

Heads, shoulders, knees and toes: listening and speaking all the way

Always adding and refining: here are some resources to help with class discussions and partner work. Enjoy! Previous posts on discussions: http://blog0rama.edublogs.org/tag/turn-and-talk/ http://blog0rama.edublogs.org/2017/07/09/summer-series-of-saves-can-we-talk-about-this/ [embeddoc url=”http://blog0rama.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/partner-work-protocols-klove-17nhkzw-1swj888.pptx” download=”all” viewer=”microsoft” ] [embeddoc url=”https://blog0rama.edublogs.org/files/2018/01/ELL-Sentence-Frames-Exploratory-Classes-27pmdyh-1iq52aw.docx” download=”all” viewer=”microsoft” ] From a colleague: [embeddoc url=”http://blog0rama.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/sentence-frames-1du5k9e-re7twh.docx” download=”all” viewer=”microsoft” ]  

Mind the Map.

https://bubbl.us/NDI3MTU5OS84MzQzNDkzL2FiMjAxMmE5YzRkMjA2ZmU2NGI1ODgxOGEwODg3NjNh-X?utm_source=page-embed&utm_medium=link&s=8343493 https://ed.ted.com/on/7WdV6Sqw Here is the teaching point/issue: How do we concurrently 1. teach students how stories work (or how anything works for that matter) 2. use technology to best demonstrate concepts 3. have students practice and grow their own knowledge? One idea: mind mapping. There are multiple available apps, etc. for this technique. We had Inspiration in our district, but not sure if we renewed the license or not. No matter.  I know we have other similar apps on our PCs for work. Mind mapping is simply brainstorming, sketching ideas in a hierarchal visual mode, and revisable in real time. For…

Saving Summer: Amygdala and The Brain

Teaching is stressful, there is no doubt or debate. And it’s also joyous, satisfying, and filled with discovery and success. But let’s get back to the stress for a moment so we can move forward with more moments of joy, satisfaction, and discovery. My buddy Sharon and her Brainiacs are developing a PD session for SEL/Teachers/Students. Tangentially, I’m developing the digital curriculum, along with her and other colleague’s input. When we talk about preparing students for their futures, not our pasts, we must have a deep understanding or exploration of what is happening to our brains in the digital world….

Saving Summer: Googling.

Recently a post on social media got to me to thinking: (well, overthinking? *shrug*) After a thread and reflection, I am trying to answer some questions: Does context play a role in teaching (anymore)? Just about “everything” can be “Googled” – how do we navigate and help students find the correct information? What is the nature of teaching with abundant access to information and misinformation? A post from the New York Times, “In an Era of Fake News, Teaching Students to Parse Fact from Fiction” discusses the challenges of teaching context. One can, indeed, Google context about a topic. How…

The Case of Kelly's Curious Curation

Note: Here is the challenge: take one hour on a Saturday or Sunday and curate your own list of three things you could make into a mini-unit, writing prompt, etc.  “Alice laughed. ‘There’s no use trying,’ she said. ‘One can’t believe impossible things.’ I daresay you haven’t had much practice,’ said the Queen. ‘When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. There goes the shawl again!” – Lewis Carroll How many times in a school year do students hear the word ‘authentic’ but…

Room in your head.

  We can’t see the stars any longer because of light pollution. But as the lady says, “The night is dark and full of terrors,” so we humans master the monsters and use all the power we can to dispel the darkness. But we don’t see things as we once did, or learn from the larger spaces and infinite wonderful universe. And perhaps — this is just an idea — we have overlooked the other toxic detriment to learning: noise pollution. Studies come out all the time based on things we know. But the knowledge needs to be re-studied, analyzed, and…

Metacognition Monday

In the 8 Days a Week post, I touched on some of the alliterative devices used to help frame a week. Frameworks help me focus: inviting students into my brain requires some house rules, ya know. During my cohort’s masters program, our primary mentor and educational goddess, Dr. Schulhauser, introduced us to this word, ‘metacognition.’ She eased us into with masterful prestidigitation, a pedagogical slight of hand, we didn’t even realize we were deeply engaged in a lesson until she showed us what lay behind the curtain: we were thinking about our thinking. But like all masters, understanding metacognition is deceptively…