Heroic measures: let's do something (anything)

17 books we loved in ‘17 📚❤️ pic.twitter.com/FOix862hFO — Project LIT Community (@ProjectLITComm) January 1, 2018 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js Happy New Year’s Day! Last night we went to see the new Star Wars movie. I bought the tickets in November and made it until the show without a single spoiler. I am thinking now — if I can navigate social media for over six weeks without a single spoiler or discussion thread — I can certainly navigate social media better overall. Because at times, it’s been terrifying. Even from those I respect and admire. In fact, quite disheartening. There are many wonderful…

series: the good stuff

Things I think about in the middle of the night: What was that noise outside? What are the best ten to twenty best, time-tested lessons for middle and high school students? The noise was nothing. Probably just a small monster or trashcan panda. The best lessons, now that’s something else. The first post in this series is something new: Bob Probst of Beers/Probst renown gave us teachers this gift: Dialogue booklet by bob probst from kylenebeers It’s a dialogue booklet that helps students move through a text with purpose. I haven’t vetted it yet, but it holds much promise.  

Mind the Map.

https://bubbl.us/NDI3MTU5OS84MzQzNDkzL2FiMjAxMmE5YzRkMjA2ZmU2NGI1ODgxOGEwODg3NjNh-X?utm_source=page-embed&utm_medium=link&s=8343493 https://ed.ted.com/on/7WdV6Sqw Here is the teaching point/issue: How do we concurrently 1. teach students how stories work (or how anything works for that matter) 2. use technology to best demonstrate concepts 3. have students practice and grow their own knowledge? One idea: mind mapping. There are multiple available apps, etc. for this technique. We had Inspiration in our district, but not sure if we renewed the license or not. No matter.  I know we have other similar apps on our PCs for work. Mind mapping is simply brainstorming, sketching ideas in a hierarchal visual mode, and revisable in real time. For…

Working.

Ah, all of this: https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fthreeteacherstalk%2Fposts%2F1910190822578447&width=500 From    [embeddoc url=”http://blog0rama.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/response-to-literature-1cbx6qp-st2bew.pptx” download=”all” viewer=”microsoft” ] Response to Literature [embeddoc url=”http://blog0rama.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/response-graphic-organizer-1l7pd3c-2i47qbb.docx” download=”all” viewer=”microsoft” ]  

Saving Summer: More Good Things

Literary Analysis, Themes, and Essay Writing, Oh my!! How did I not know about this? (probably because of PG-13 language: I’ll get permission slips, promise!) ThugNotes is narrated by Sparky Sweets, Ph.D., and yes there is some language, but the plot summaries and analysis are epic. For a secondary audience, this modern version of CliffsNotes is helpful and entertaining. Since I’m teaching a unit on Lord of the Flies next year I am thankful for his analysis and insight. Next: thinking about essays and writing structures differently: An Essay Primer for Adults: Six Essay Types You Should Know by Lorraine Berry…

Saving Summer: Hugo House and Shared Writing

  Summer fills up fast, faster than a kiddie pool in an Orlando backyard, faster than a cup of coffee at an all-night diner, faster than…well, dang. I’m out of analogies. But, there is a remedy for lack of inspiration! One of the highlights so far included time and money well spent at Hugo House at the Write-O-Rama on July 8. Since the dismantling of the Puget Sound Writing Project, I’ve been untethered in Since the dismantling of the Puget Sound Writing Project, I’ve been untethered in terms of having others to talk about and share writing. It’s been…well, I’ve…

26 Love Letters

                A few weeks ago, an NPR report discussed the disappearance and resulting anxiety of the lost art of cursive handwriting from elementary school curriculum. Years ago, when I was working at Starbucks many of my younger co-workers could not read my handwriting, and while this made me feel “old,” it really made me feel sad. There must have been some valid reason why I learned cursive handwriting other than ‘tradition’ or rote direct instruction. There had to be something there, some pedagogical reason besides just having good penmanship. While I strongly disagree…

Loving monster arms.

My teacher-self and my creative-self had to take a break from one another for a bit. What I loved so much about teaching was its inherent creativity and craft, and for some reason, perhaps many reasons, this disconnected for me. I couldn’t seem to fit my mental sabbatical in a time-frame clock-shaped box that is a ‘summer vacation.’ This regeneration of loving my crafted profession, my calling if you will, required some slash-and-burn style chaos to opportunity regrowth. In other words, I was burnt out. Happens to the best of us. But now–it feels like time for growth again. Maybe…