Series: White People Homework (12) Bad Behaviors

A quick look at school behavior programs.

Series: White People Homework: (11)

What I tried to say in this post, But Justin Schleider (@SchleiderJustin) said it so much better: I am specifically talking to White people because we are the ones who created the problem and we are the ones who need to work towards rectifying what we have done. Plus I can only speak to the groups I am a part of and understand. https://slowchatpe.com/2020/06/09/and-we-still-need-you/ Still, others may be young and just entered the field of education. You have been raised in a White bubble (like myself) and through the purposeful guidance of our communities and family, you have not fully…

Series: White People Homework: The Cost (8)

I am an amateur in so many areas, it’s really kind of lame. One of the mental games I like to play with myself is the hidden costs of things, like trying to pull data from chaos. I am ill equipped and humbled. All I can offer is I like to think about big things, and this will be separated by multiple posts. The question is: How does racism affect white people? Understand this question is not intended to center white people. We’ve been centered plenty. It’s meant to explore why this construct of race and power keeps getting propped…

Series: WPH: Militarizing Racism (3)

What is our history and current situation of militarizing police?

Fresh Start 101

Do students come to your classroom year with reputations?  Well. Yes. And–I’m struggling with the past clinging to some students. That’s about as diplomatic as I’m can muster right now. How Black Girls Aren’t Presumed to Be Innocent THE PRESENCE OF JUSTICE A new study finds that adults view them as less child-like and less in need of protection than their white peers. ADRIENNE GREEN JUN 29, 2017 A growing body of evidence has shown that the American education and criminal-justice systems dole out harsher and more frequent discipline to black youth compared with their non-black peers. But while most…

Summer Series of Saves: Discuss, please

Twitter, well, Twitter is a lot of things but it does provide some great discussion/debate threads if you’re patient to find the gems. Here are five threads that gave me some ideas for discussion questions: What causes poverty: moral failures or society’s failures? (*remember, in strong argumentative reasoning there is always the third rail) Once again, we continue to treat poverty like a moral failure. Thank you for your contribution and being the conductor on a train that is never late. https://t.co/PSW4czkIAm — Jemele Hill (@jemelehill) August 18, 2018 Why don’t more girls sign up for computer or technology classes? …

Cake in the rain.

  We all know this isn’t about cake. I’m trying to sort this out for my own sake, and then for my students’. Cornell Law Review Link. Amendment I Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances. Here is a chart I put together. It’s only a start, and I’m wondering what is missing: https://quoteinvestigator.com/2011/10/15/liberty-fist-nose/ Someone sent me a full list of people…

Part I: Renaissance Fairness

Sometimes we teachers may grow cynical about the ‘career and college’ ready mission statement. It’s not hard to see why: when our nation voted gave corporations the same voting rights as human beings we knew we were in deep trouble. To avoid that rabbit hole, I’ll just say this: we still work, and one of our jobs as teachers is to show students the opportunities and pathways so they can make the work-life decisions for themselves with the best and rigorous information. And a secret to all this is — not all work is bad. Far from it. Modeling passion…

Heroic measures: teach critical thinking

My big question this morning: how do we teach, and learn, to think critically? Not the surface-level fluff–but the hard questions, the wrestling with the trifecta of intellectual stagnation: cognitive dissonance, justification, and rationalization? Do we need heroes/heroines? What would happen…if…we…didn’t? What if…we were good to each other, did no harm, and made our classrooms, lecture halls, and online spaces engaged and safe places to discuss questions and seek ideas and answers? Consider and read this thread: keep track and curate the narratives you teach: by every figure, do a character study. We need to face and review the decisions of…