Series: White People Homework- What’s in a name? (14) (Updated)

We’re not a football family in our house. And like many areas of fandom, it’s okay–no judgment on those who love football, and as far as we know we aren’t judged by others. Wouldn’t matter. So forgive me for not knowing who Emmanuel Acho is. Turns out, he’s pretty amazing! And I am so grateful for other media formats who bring people such as him into my life and help me learn. And I am an ELA/ELL teacher; however, full disclosure, I was not an English major in college. Most of what I learned about mechanics, style guides, and conventions…

Series: White People Homework: Joy (10)

Sag Harbor is 11 yrs old, but it’s a side of CWhitehead that might surprise readers that know only his two most recent novels. AND it’s about the summer AND an African American setting that many readers might not know exists https://t.co/3XIFvnrNDO #DisruptTexts #SummerReading — Joel /hō•ÉL/ Garza is cofounder of #THEBOOKCHAT 📓 (@JoelRGarza) June 10, 2020 When I first began teaching, I used a lot of picture books. I still do, actually; I didn’t this past year as much because well, it was this past year. One book I loved as a read aloud was Skippyjon Jones by Judith…

Summer Series of Saves: Discuss, please

Twitter, well, Twitter is a lot of things but it does provide some great discussion/debate threads if you’re patient to find the gems. Here are five threads that gave me some ideas for discussion questions: What causes poverty: moral failures or society’s failures? (*remember, in strong argumentative reasoning there is always the third rail) Once again, we continue to treat poverty like a moral failure. Thank you for your contribution and being the conductor on a train that is never late. https://t.co/PSW4czkIAm — Jemele Hill (@jemelehill) August 18, 2018 Why don’t more girls sign up for computer or technology classes? …

the devastating abyss

  I am not a fan of Ayn Rand. At all. Clearly, this is not an image of Ayn Rand. It’s Colin Kaepernick. There is a name on this T-shirt of someone I have seen. I didn’t know him, but my colleagues did. His name is on our gymnasium wall as an athlete of the year from a previous time. A few months ago at a gathering, a dear acquaintance stated how much she hated Colin Kaepernick. Since I was a guest in someone else’s home I didn’t pursue the topic nor challenge her opinion. We’ve already been divided and…

Saving Summer: Flat-lining.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fpermalink.php%3Fstory_fbid%3D980549355418923%26id%3D402441646563033%26substory_index%3D0&width=500 The Ongoing Battle Between Science Teachers And Fake News NPR-Ed posted an article this morning about how science teachers encounter young minds already signed onto misconceptions and falsehoods. This touched a hard nerve with me, as for years I’ve done my best to straddle the dangerous tightrope between critical thinking skills and teachings of celebrities/prophets. Every time I teach a mythology or origin mythology unit I state a disclaimer that this is just what other cultures believe, and if they practice a religion/faith, their leaders at their place of worship have studied these same stories, too, to gain better…

Saving Summer: Rethinking Themes, Essays, and Media

I’m about to do a dangerous thing: post a document long before it’s “ready.” It is not even close, and I think–that’s where it should be. A finished document would mean there is no room for growth or adaptation; it’s a sketch. Flipping my thinking around about the silo type of units, students would be better served if we took a gravitational, or centrifugal force idea. While we’re spinning, we stay connected and use metacognition to be cognizant of what draws us in. Choices are key, here, with a map for guidance. In essence, every UBD and essential questions demand…

Saving Summer: Googling.

Recently a post on social media got to me to thinking: (well, overthinking? *shrug*) After a thread and reflection, I am trying to answer some questions: Does context play a role in teaching (anymore)? Just about “everything” can be “Googled” – how do we navigate and help students find the correct information? What is the nature of teaching with abundant access to information and misinformation? A post from the New York Times, “In an Era of Fake News, Teaching Students to Parse Fact from Fiction” discusses the challenges of teaching context. One can, indeed, Google context about a topic. How…