Let’s talk: “Digital Native”

The term, “digital native” has always bothered me. It was coined by a man named Marc Prensky, and its original intent: Prensky defines digital natives as those born into an innate “new culture” while the digital immigrants are old-world settlers, who have lived in the analogue age and immigrated to the digital world. https://www.cnn.com/2012/12/04/business/digital-native-prensky/index.html Okay — hold up. First: Native. Second: Immigrant? His word choices always bugged the **** out of me. And I am not qualified to respond to his intent, but the impact his work had on two important groups: teachers and students. The amount of ageism and…

Grow up.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fviralthread%2Fvideos%2F824556247717060%2F&show_text=1&width=560 This was a post from TeenVogue on Facebook this morning. Now: TeenVogue is amazing. Its editorial and content have been one of the few media sanctuaries for many of us, young and old, in these troubled times. The magazine tackles politics, social justice, and yes, fashion issues. Its holistic approach to youth and news is refreshing. But dang, kids, really? Ageism?  My 8th-grade students often comment on how fast I type and text. I learned the QWERTY method when I was a sophomore, in a room full of electric typewriters, staring at an overhead projector screen with our typing…

Stolen time…

As it turns out, I can only do ten things well, not eleven. Guess I don’t go to eleven. Oh well. Anyway – I haven’t been posting on this blog frequently for two simple reasons: first, haven’t wanted to use any of the time in my contractual day with personal technological communications and missives, and second, by the time I get home I want to goof-off. You know, be a responsible wife, mom, writer, and part-time gamer. Sure there are loads of clean laundry in there, too, but have been suspicious about certain odors. But the thing is, I started…

You really DO like to read, don't you?

Teens read more than they let on.
If you believe a scary US report, reading is on the decline. But, says Steven Johnson, it completely fails to consider the amount that we do every day on our computers.

Room in your head.

  We can’t see the stars any longer because of light pollution. But as the lady says, “The night is dark and full of terrors,” so we humans master the monsters and use all the power we can to dispel the darkness. But we don’t see things as we once did, or learn from the larger spaces and infinite wonderful universe. And perhaps — this is just an idea — we have overlooked the other toxic detriment to learning: noise pollution. Studies come out all the time based on things we know. But the knowledge needs to be re-studied, analyzed, and…

Whisper and Shout

TL:DR –what I’m going to use from Miller’s The Book Whisperer. Free choice. Free choice. Free choice. I may need to take a little break from the Notice and Note Facebook group. Don’t misunderstand me–it’s a kind, forgiving, supportive, and collegial place. Teachers reaching out to one another for advice, sharing ideas and lessons; it’s wonderful and sweet. But… …when they speak of Donalyn Miller’s The Book Whisperer some teachers still speak the words “accountable” and “tracking.” I wonder if they read the same book I did. Many of Miller’s ideas I’ve done on my own, and it was validating to…

Broken slipper.

Tonight is the Technology Expo for my district. Normally it’s in April, which is why I find myself somewhat nonplussed that I am home, not at a booth with shining, imaginative and articulate students representing the best of the digital world and its powers to educational leaders from all over the world. Not even close. Because I missed the e-mail asking for participants. Yup. That one blew right past me. Was told it was sent in October, or around then. Right now what I am finding ironic is that this is the first year I’m teaching in the Technology Academy…

Media Festival: Go West, Teacher! (Part 2)

This is a follow-up to Part 1 of “Go West, Teacher!” One of my burning questions is a ‘Now and Then’ sort of game — what do we do now, and what did folks do back then to (fill in the blank)? Many of these will be treated in a constructivist model, with the questions posed as writing about what students’ experiences are now, and then constructing and inquiring about the past. Any suggestions for constructing meaning and thinking are welcome.  How did the Europeans construct their ‘new world?’ What ideals should they have left behind, and what values and…