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Saving Summer: Real world problems.

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My response:

What do I post today?

Do I show an image of Heather Heyer, the young woman who was murdered on Saturday, August 12 in Charlottesville? Do I talk about the boy-man, who allegedly ran her down in the crowd of counter-protesters? Or the initial interview with his mother who had no idea what happened, or who he was?

I look at others media posts: simply trying to live their happy lives, going through transitions and life moments without any of static and noise of this angry, angry world. On one hand, I am envious of their impervious membranes, and on the other, wondering and questioning if they are part of this problem. What would happen if everyone, and I mean everyone, took a moment and denounced our current administration?

Yesterday three men told me I was crazy in different contexts. They are strangers to me.

One question that we conscientious educators consider is trying to engage students in real-world problems. And right now, I am so grateful I don’t teach at a predominately white school. It’s cowardice. To teach in a diverse, global environment, rich in cultures and perspectives, is a blessing. It’s the foundation for my personal love of humanity: we can disagree and discuss, and think of ways to solve issues without the racist baggage of willful ignorance. If you don’t know what I mean, watch the video footage of the mother whose son is accused of plowing his car and murdering Heather, and injuring over a dozen more.

Real world problems? We have many. Putting them in a frame? Harder to do.

Right now the only real-world problem that is most urgent is to understand and mind-map how our government works, how it breaks down, and how we can get things done. How do we name things correctly, and force our politicians to do the same?

As I am creating curriculum with a light touch of student-constructivism, we are all challenged to make sure we intentionally help them come to their own ideas. This is hard but important work. And I am running out of time.

Postscript: Resources

The first thing teachers should do when school starts is talk about hatred in America. Here’s help.

Curriculum for White Americans to Educate Themselves on Race and Racism–from Ferguson to Charleston

 

 

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